Saturday, 8 July 2017

Fireplace goes in

This should be a pretty straightforward visual of the fireplace and chimney breast going in place.

I used double side sticky tape on the bottom of the chimney breast.  The thinking being that glue would make a mess if it dragged on the floor. Ideally it wouldn't touch the floor as there was enough wriggle room to get it in without doing that.



My usual De Luxe model glue on the back of the chimney breast and fire box.  I find it sticks to paint better than wood glue does and the wall it was going to was painted.


 Remembe the previously drilled holes and the cocktail stick marker, that was I was working with to get the 'unit' in exactly the right place.  It was  all a bit fiddly locating the hole in the fire back without shoving glue hither and yon.  Success though and the chimney breast shoved nicely on to the back walls, no gaps, no funny angles.  I do like this MDF kit.


The marble hearth in front of the fire measured six inches the chimney breast measured five so I used an easy guide of a six inch ruler to glue the hearth down at the half inch mark.



Everything nicely centered and the grate and coals could go in.  This isn't glued in.... just in case?


The mantel went in in place just by eye as there was very little room for error



I now have a room just waiting for all its wood trims.  Not especially looking forward to a couple of days painting trims but needs must .......



Major learn from this .....  no need to get fancy schmantzy and drill the hole for the fire wire at an early stage and then spend ages fiddling a 'unit' into place.  Skip that move and just measure and mark where your chimney breast will go (on the wall or floor using masking tape)  and glue it in and, then drill the hole for the fire wire through the fire-back and back wall.  Obvious really.

16 comments:

  1. Thank you for this post. Your blog has taught me not only what a "chimney breast" is (I knew, just had never heard it given a name) but how to install one. I purchased one a month or so ago and wondered how to install it.....glue or tape. Now I know. I really like your hearth. Is that from dollhouse flooring? Great job as always!

    Beth

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    1. Hi Beth, doing this game I did discover a while ago that Americans and English have different names for parts of a fireplace so that can be a bit confusing... pretty sure they don't use the word 'breast'.... less to do with bosoms though and more to do with the verb meaning to move forward or face outwards. As always don't take any of my self-invented methods as gospel for fixing anything, you may want to google search it. All I know is that this works for me. Thanks as always for stopping by. M

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    2. Thank you Marilyn, we're still struggling with the English language over here::))

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    3. I spent six months a year in Naples, Florida for fifteen years so I am pretty much bi-lingual! There is an argument that your English is simply closer to the English of a few hundred years ago.....it changed less than our version did. Our language went different ways along with everythjng else when we 'split'.😀

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  2. Looking good, Marilyn! I love how much space the room has! Can't wait to see how you fill it up!

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    1. Ooooh Jodi, don't even go there - one day one idea, next day another!!!! M

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  3. Hello Marylin,
    Well done. the room is a great space. Your tips are very much appreciated.
    Big hug
    Giac

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    1. I can not believe you can glean anything from my ramblings your own work is miles ahead of mine. Just happy you even read my stuff. M

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  4. thanks for the great tutorial.

    Hugs
    Marisa

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    1. Hello and welcome Marissa, so nice to see a new face. M

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  5. Your fireplace is amazing and perfect in this room.

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    1. Thank you, Fabiola, I do just think of things like fireplaces as being the 'bricks and mortar' of a build until I come to do one and then realise just how many choices you have to make for it to be 'right' in the room. So I am very happy you think it fits the setting. M

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  6. Another job well done Em! I am always amazed at how the installation of a chimney and a mantle will automatically warm up a room with or without a fire : )

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    1. So utterly agree with you - big hole in a room without its heart in place. M

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  7. This post has just given me the nudge I need to make my own chimney breast as I've been dawdling over this. It's a very swanky fire you have in place too!

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    1. You already know its easy peasy - it is just getting started that's difficult, especially when the sun shines and there is Wimbledon to watch! Pretty much all my fireplaces from day one have been the Phoenix ones that you glue together. I love them because the scale is spot on and their historical accuracy likewise, so whatever period you are in there is one (or more) for that time. I get mine mostly from Jennifers of Walsall. M

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